Forum Home Gallery Register FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Gardener's Forums



Go Back   Gardener's Forums > Gardener's Forums > Lawns

Notices

Advertisement

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old Saturday 23rd August 2008, 22:50
Peewit's Avatar
Peewit Peewit is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: England
Posts: 1,687
Question Moss growth in Lawns

Hi There

We have an uneven lawn here through neglect we believe - where we stay. We are trying to cure some the problems from neglectful previous tenants

Recently, I have noticed an invasion of moss at one end. What is the best 'eco' frendly way to dispose of it so it will not grow and take over once more

I am thinking that nasty 'moss killers' are not for me as I do not want to effect the wildlife in our garden. We have lots of b*rds, wildlife and we do not want them to suffer the side effects in any way.

Any ideas, or thoughts would be appreciated.

Kathy
x
__________________
My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style. Maya Angelou
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old Sunday 24th August 2008, 21:30
msmum
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Noticed that you have had any answers here yet, so thought I'd help you out. There's nothing harmful about adding some lime to your soil to increase the ph balance. Moss also likes a compact base - so maybe try aerating it, and doing a sand top dress to get some air and drainage to the roots. The lime will increase the ph balance in the soil - making it not so friendly to the moss. If you don't want to kill it off with moss killer, get a good moss rake and it'll come up with the rake. As long as you change the alkalines in the soil, it shouldn't come back. You'd hten need to reseed the area in order for the grass to take. If it's shady, obviously try a variety of grass specifically for shady areas.
Maybe with the pruning of bushes etc. that has been mentioned on the other threads, you'll get more sunshine to the area as well, helping to eliminate the moss further.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old Monday 25th August 2008, 21:05
Peewit's Avatar
Peewit Peewit is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: England
Posts: 1,687
Smile

hi There

I forgot to mention in my last post that my lawn is sloped at one end, so I am sure that is why there is an ongoing problem as there is at the moment with moss.

Love to hear any suggestions or ideas from someone who had similair problems at the moment, and how they dealt with their own situation.

Kathy
x
__________________
My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style. Maya Angelou

Last edited by Peewit; Monday 25th August 2008 at 21:47.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old Monday 25th August 2008, 22:00
msmum
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
The above solutions weren't used on my own lawns....but were used on lawns of customers when my ex and I had a landscaping company The sloping will of course take more moisture down to the mossy area if the drainage is not very good - but again - aerating will help that by stopping the earth below from becoming too compacted.....
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old Tuesday 26th August 2008, 13:27
d.steeley d.steeley is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: coventry
Posts: 552
Hi Kathy, moss is a symptom of an underlying problem such as poor drainage, low light and poor soil nutrient/pH balance as msum pointed out. Ideally I would apply a moss killer which is most likey made from Sulphate of Iron to kill off the moss first. Then it needs to be scarified by either raking vigourously with a lawn rake (hard work) or use a purpose built machine that you may be able to hire or buy one from B&Q etc. Scarify several times and don't worry about the lawn looking devastated; it will recover. Secondly, aerated to improve drainage and compaction. Use a garden fork and insert it into the lawn to a depth of 4" at 6"-9" intervals. If possible spread a thin layer of sharp sand over the lawn and brush it in using a stiff brush/broom. Apply a dressing of Autumn lawn fertiliser (not Spring/Summer) and if the lawn is very sparse, over-seed with fresh grass seed of your choice (so that it matches the grasses in your lawn). Do this in the autumn, October is a good time. Adding lime could be a good idea but I would first like to check the pH as it may already be alkaline. Also finer grasses prefer an acidic soil whereas coarser grasses prefer lime. Moss will always grow in laws to some degree and this process may have to be continued annually. Weaker grass is more likely to succomb to moss so do not mow to close and feed the lawn in the growing season.

Heres a link:

http://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile...utumn_lawn.asp

Dave
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old Tuesday 26th August 2008, 13:38
Peewit's Avatar
Peewit Peewit is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: England
Posts: 1,687
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by d.steeley View Post
Hi Kathy, moss is a symptom of an underlying problem such as poor drainage, low light and poor soil nutrient/pH balance. Ideally I would apply a moss killer which is most likey made from Sulphate of Iron to kill off the moss first. Then it needs to be scarified by either raking vigourously with a lawn rake (hard work) or use a purpose built machine that you may be able to hire or buy one from B&Q etc. Scarify several times and don't worry about the lawn looking devastated; it will recover. Secondly, aerated to improve drainage and compaction. Use a garden fork and insert it into the lawn to a depth of 4" at 6"-9" intervals. If possible spread a thin layer of sharp sand over the lawn and brush it in using a stiff brush/broom. Apply a dressing of Autumn lawn fertiliser (not Spring/Summer) and if the lawn is very sparse, over-seed with fresh grass seed of your choice (so that it matches the grasses in your lawn). Do this in the autumn, October is a good time. Adding lime could be a good idea but I would first like to check the pH as it may already be alkaline. Also finer grasses prefer an acidic soil whereas coarser grasses prefer lime. Moss will always grow in laws to some degree and this process may have to be continued annually. Weaker grass is more likely to succomb to moss so do not mow to close and feed the lawn in the growing season.

Heres a link:

http://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile...utumn_lawn.asp

Dave
hi Dave

Thank you for your reply Dave, very useful along with the link

I had thought of pronging the grass, and I could see it as being benfical at the best of times to help the drainage of the lawn itself. As you have siasd it is an autumn job.

So it means somne hard labour but at least the results will be more beneficla in the long run.

We will charge the landlord for any extras we buy (we will keep the receipts)

We have a visit form the Esatate Agents this Friday, so I will point the problem out and see if anything can be done about it?

I will mention everything that you have said here and see what the result is!

Kathy
x
__________________
My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style. Maya Angelou
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old Tuesday 26th August 2008, 18:34
d.steeley d.steeley is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: coventry
Posts: 552
Hi Kathy, if it is a big area of lawn it might be an idea to see if the estate agent would pay for it to be looked after by one of the many firms that specialise in lawn care.

Dave
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old Tuesday 26th August 2008, 20:32
Peewit's Avatar
Peewit Peewit is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: England
Posts: 1,687
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by d.steeley View Post
Hi Kathy, if it is a big area of lawn it might be an idea to see if the estate agent would pay for it to be looked after by one of the many firms that specialise in lawn care.

Dave
Hi Dave

Thank you for your answer.

The back lawn is not big as such. It takes my OH less than 30 mims to mow it. We have no grass in the front area.

Now that is a good idea, and a good thing to ask the estate agent. I am sure that our estate agent will have a gardener as part of their outfit. They have all the utility people that you need if required.

Kathy
x
__________________
My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style. Maya Angelou
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 14:51.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.