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Frost Resistant Pots

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  #1  
Old Monday 5th January 2009, 14:17
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Frost Resistant Pots

I am disappointed to discover one of the terracotta pots (we have three identical) which houses a hosta has cracked in the frost. It was bought as a frost resistant pot (I wouldn't bother to buy anything which isn't frost resistant) and is in a sheltered spot on the terrace against the south-west facing house wall. It is quite old (probably about 12 years!) so I suppose I can't complain too much. But it is disappointing.
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Old Monday 5th January 2009, 15:27
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We have had frost resistant pots crack in the past,but as you say ours were old.
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Old Monday 5th January 2009, 16:19
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Me too! I reckon terracotta isn't really frost resistant. I have another couple and the edges are sheering off. Tho the one with the hosta in , I had such a job to get it out to slit up, I probably damaged the pot
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Old Monday 5th January 2009, 20:13
d.steeley d.steeley is offline  
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Remember, 'frost resistant' is different from 'frost proof'. Most pots crack because as the compost inside them freezes it expands. Best to treat them all as 'liable to frost damage' and wrap them in bubble wrap or something similar.

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Old Monday 5th January 2009, 21:09
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My mistake Dave - I meant frost proof! I wouldn't buy anything that wasn't frost proof!

Never mind, it has lasted quite a while. Guess I shall have to look for a replacement in the spring.
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Old Monday 5th January 2009, 22:44
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I have often wondered about Frost proof pots ie terracotta

We have some really large pots(terracotta), and they have been quite robust up to now. One suffered injury from an overenthusiastic window cleaner one day, and suffered a crack or two.

I find the smaller the terracotta pot the bigger the break.

Maybe it is just me, but I find all my terracotta pots have survived very well. The Scottish frosts have proved that to be the case.

http://www.thepotplace.co.uk/frost_proof_or_not.htm

The link explains if you leave water in the Terracotta pot the higher the chances of frost causing problems.

It appears it is not the type of 'delicate' pot you have, it is what you do with it to prevent any damage.
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Old Tuesday 6th January 2009, 08:40
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Perhaps Scotland has "the right sort of frost"
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Old Thursday 8th January 2009, 15:23
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it generly depends on the amount of residual water that is within the structure of the pot as frozen compost can slide upward if the pot is dry but if the terracotta has a high water content it bonds to the compost .
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Old Thursday 8th January 2009, 21:55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by judimac View Post
Perhaps Scotland has "the right sort of frost"
Hi Judi

Not really - it is just a lot colder than England.

I think the link has said keeping pools of water away from your pots so they do not crack. Do not sit pots in water etc...

Also to put your pots up on legs so they are not resting on the ground at all.
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Old Monday 12th January 2009, 15:11
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Alice from Gardeners World gave a tip in last weekend's Daily Mail. She said if you stand your pots on a plastic disc (the polystyrene disc from a supermarket bought pizza cut to size is ideal) then the pot shouldn't crack. I haven't tried it myself yet but thought I would pass it on.
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